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...Philip Treacy’s 1993 show was presented at London Fashion Week. Treacy’s traditional millinery techniques were directly reflected in his proportions. The balance of his hats and fascinators, swooping asymmetrically on the head, not only...
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...Philip Treacy’s Spring/Summer 1995 womenswear show for his eponymous brand was presented at London Fashion Week. The collection showcased Treacy’s hats with models wearing simple clothing such as tailored trousers suits and simple dresses...
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...Philip Treacy’s Autumn/Winter 1998 show was presented at London Fashion Week. His millinery designs, with swooping fascinators and sculptural hats, referenced a range of diverse subjects such as surrealism, nature, and historical imagery...
...Born in the village of Ahascragh in western Ireland in 1967, Philip Treacy learned to sew at age five and made hats for his sister’s dolls from feathers shed by his mother’s chickens and ducks. Treacy’s formal training began in 1985 when he...
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...Philip Treacy's Autumn/Winter 1996 show was presented at London Fashion Week. Treacy showed his mastery of millinery in the collection, drawing on nature as his inspiration and twisting velvet, satin, and net into elaborate and fanciful...
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...Philip Treacy’s Autumn/Winter 1997 show for his eponymous brand was presented at London Fashion Week. The show coincided with Treacy’s fifth and final award of British Accessory Designer of the Year at the British Fashion Awards...
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...Philip Treacy's Autumn/Winter 1999 show was presented at London Fashion Week. A technological fantasy, it was a show of the designer's eccentric and forward-thinking hat and accessory design. The show opened with colorful tin hats, moving...

Anatomy of an accessory

John Lau

John Lau graduated with a first class honours in womenswear design at London College of Fashion and has a masters in enterprise. John has worked in various roles within the fashion industry and has experience as a fashion stylist and writer for the international magazines Loaded and the Chinese edition of Vogue. He has helped new brands develop their creative and business direction both in the UK, Hong Kong and China, and continues to have an active role in fashion as a consultant for retail, branding, production and distribution. John is currently a Senior Lecturer in International Fashion Business at Manchester Metropolitan University, teaching on the Fashion Buying and Clothing Design and Technology programmes. Along with his teaching, John is working towards his PhD and has research interests in international fashion branding and is currently co-authoring and editing two textbooks on fashion buying and fashion merchandising. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Basics Fashion Design 09: Designing Accessories : Exploring the design and construction of bags, shoes, hats and jewellery

Fairchild Books, 2012

Book chapter

...Sarah Burton for Alexander McQueen creates a delicate headpiece with web-like lace that echoes the exquisite dresses on the catwalk. What is an accessory? An accessory is an object that is worn on the body or carried by a person, yet...
...The Collection in Context Shown at the Ritz Hotel in Paris, in the Windsor suite, Lagerfeld’s spring/summer 1997 collection resembled the traditional couture show. Instead of resorting to gimmicks and his ability to put on an over-the-top...

Hats, Hair Accessories, Wigs, and Hairpieces

Celia Stall-Meadows

Celia Stall-Meadows is assistant professor of Fashion Marketing in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Her professional memberships include the International Textile and Apparel Association and the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Know Your Fashion Accessories

Fairchild Publications, 2004

Book chapter

...Mad as a HatterRemember the Mad Hatter in Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland? In the 1800s, makers of felt hats did indeed go mad as a result of mercury nitrate poisoning. Inhaling the mercury fumes during felt hat processing...